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Religious values


Lyceum Church

Lyceum Church

The church used to be a mosque. It was built from the stones of a Turkish house of worship by Pauline monks to the plans of their fellow monk, Máté Vépi.

Pius Church

Pius Church

The church, also known as The Heart of Jesus, was completed in 1930 and it is a pleasing representation of Modern architecture.

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St. Bartholomew’s Bell Tower

St. Bartholomew’s Bell Tower

The twenty-first century bell-tower of the mosque. As it had long been the wish of the Church to have a peal to accompany the Catholic ceremonies, in 2004, it was donated a bell tower.

Synagogue

Synagogue

There were Jews living in Pécs even before the Turkish Occupation but they could only return to the city quite late.

Lutheran Church

Lutheran Church

The church stands in a small garden behind fine pattern railings and with the figure of a priest to one side. It was built in early Eclectic style in 1875, based on the plans of János Baldauf.

Havihegy Chapel

Havihegy Chapel

It is the compass of Pécs, its tower indicating directions. The Havas Boldogasszony-chapel on Havihegy is a determinative point of the southern slopes of the Mecsek.

Calvary, Kálvária Street

Calvary, Kálvária Street

Close to the northern gate of the city wall steep steps lead to the Stations of the Cross.

Church of the Hospitaller Order

Church of the Hospitaller Order

The square is bordered on the south by the Loránt Palace (once the accommodation of the Serb occupying forces) and the church and monastery of the Hospitaller Order.

Crucifix

Crucifix

The first crucifix of Havi-hegy was erected in 1745. Allegedly it commemorates a clergyman who plunged to the depths, dying of a broken heart.

Franciscan church, 35-37, Ferencesek Street

Franciscan church, 35-37, Ferencesek Street

The church that used to stand here in the Middle Ages was transformed into a mosque by the Turkish. Eventually, after 150 years of occupation, it was eventually returned to the Franciscans, who had maintained their identity.

All Saints’ Church

All Saints’ Church

The oldest church of the city was built in Romanesque style in the twelfth century. Turkish invaders allowed free practice of religion in this church alone.